What are the 4 main religions in Indonesia?

What is the main religion in Indonesia today?

Almost 90% of the population of Indonesia is Muslim, gaining the archipelago the title of largest Muslim population in a country. However, Sharia law, the Islamic law, isn’t implemented in all of Indonesia where there are 6 official religions: Islam, Protestantism, Catholicism, Hinduism, Confucianism and Buddhism.

What is the main religion in Indonesia 2021?

9.87% are Christian, 1.69% are Hindu, 0.72% are Buddhist and 0.56% practice other faiths. The Indonesian constitution grants religious freedom although the government only officially recognizes Islam, Protestantism, Roman Catholicism, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Confucianism.

What are the five faith in Indonesia?

Indonesia’s main religion is Islam, though the government officially recognizes six distinct faiths: Islam, Protestantism, Catholicism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Confucianism.

What is the state religion of Indonesia?

Although Indonesia is generally considered to be a Muslim state, and is indeed the world’s most populous Muslim-majority nation, it has a sizeable Christian minority as a legacy of Dutch colonialism, with Christians often occupying relatively high social positions.

Is Indonesia was a Hindu country?

Hinduism in Indonesia, as of the 2018 census, is practised by about 1.74% of the total population, and almost 87% of the population in Bali. Hinduism is one of the six official religions of Indonesia.

Official Census (2010)

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Province Indonesia
Hindu 2010 4,012,116
% Hindu 2010 1.69%
% Hindu 2000 1.79%

What percentage of Indonesia is Chinese?

2010

Ethnic group Population (million) Percentage
Balinese 3.028 1.51
Chinese Indonesian 2.832 1.20
Sasak 2.611 1.17
Makassarese 1.982 0.99

Is Indonesia Sunni or Shia?

Indonesia is the world’s most populous Muslim nation but the majority of the country’s Muslims are Sunnis. Being a Shia is not illegal in Indonesia, but religious minorities have complained that they are increasingly becoming the victims of violent crimes that often go unpunished. Karishma Vaswani reports from Madura.