Question: What type of climate does Jakarta have?

What type of climate does Indonesia have?

The climate of Indonesia is almost entirely tropical. The uniformly warm waters that make up 81% of Indonesia’s area ensures that temperatures on land remain fairly constant, with the coastal plains averaging 28 °C, the inland and mountain areas averaging 26 °C, and the higher mountain regions, 23 °C.

Does Jakarta have winter?

There are two major seasons in Jakarta which are the dry season (June to September) and the wet season (October to April) which makes for the winter weather in Jakarta. … The wet season in Jakarta can be considered as a part of winters, especially the months from December to February.

Is Jakarta hot or cold?

The climate in Jakarta is hot, oppressive, and overcast. Over the course of the year, the temperature typically varies from 74°F to 91°F and is rarely below 72°F or above 94°F.

Does Indonesia ever get cold?

In general, temperatures drop approximately 1 °C per 90-meter increase in elevation from sea level with some high-altitude interior mountain regions experiencing night frosts.

What is the climate of Indonesia 2021?

The climate of Indonesia is almost entirely tropical. The uniformly warm waters that make up 81% of Indonesia’s area ensures that temperatures on land remain fairly constant, with the coastal plains averaging 28 °C, the inland and mountain areas averaging 26 °C, and the higher mountain regions, 23 °C.

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Why is Indonesia so hot?

Indra added that in October, the Earth’s northern hemisphere tilted away from the center of the solar system meaning that the Sun appeared to move directly above areas just south of the equator, bringing intense heat to Java, Bali, South Sulawesi, and more.

What is the coldest month in Indonesia?

The warmest month is September with an average maximum temperature of 31°C (87°F). The coldest month is July with an average maximum temperature of 28°C (82°F). January is the most wet month. This month should be avoided if you are not a big fan of rain.

Why is Jakarta sinking?

Like many coastal cities around the world, Jakarta is dealing with sea-level rise. But Indonesia’s biggest city also has a unique problem: Because of restricted water access in the city, the majority of its residents have to extract groundwater to survive. And it’s causing the city to sink.